If you work in human resources or you’re a senior figure having managed an employee, there’s every chance you’ll occasionally receive a request to provide an employment verification letter. Or, in other terms, a proof of employment letter. This formal document is the best and simplest way to fulfill this type of request.

It doesn’t need to be in great detail, either. An employment verification letter typically contains information such as:

In some cases, other information might be needed to verify employment, such as whether you would ever re-hire the employee in question or their responsibilities. But it also depends on what your organization permits you to share with other businesses. 

For example, if the person was fired, the organization might ask why they were terminated. This can be sensitive and it’s up to your employer whether to share something of this nature.

Tips for writing an employment verification letter

If you’ve been asked to produce an employment verification letter, here’s what you need to include to keep it professional and ensure it’s in the correct format. 

  • Keep it brief: An employment verification letter should be short and to the point. Only provide the information that’s asked of you and nothing extra.
  • Keep it professional: Use a standard business letter format. That means placing the contact information and date at the top, the recipient’s information underneath as well as a friendly and professional greeting.
  • Explain anything you don’t include: You should also look to include the information requested. If they’ve asked for salary and hours worked, feel free to include that, but nothing more. However, if there’s something sensitive your business doesn’t let you share, explain that it’s in your policy not to reveal this information rather than ignoring the request entirely.
  • Share your details: Offer to answer any more questions and share your contact information if they need to contact you again.
  • Proofread: Don’t send the employment verification letter without re-reading it first. It’s a robust and valuable document with a lot on the line. Read through for any mistakes and correct them before hitting send.

Samples and templates for employment verification letters

If you’re struggling with creating an employment verification letter, here are samples to help inspire you.

Simple verification

“[Name, job title, company name and address]

[Date]

[Recipient name, job title, company name and address]

Dear Mr. Scott,

I’m writing to verify that Stanley has been employed at [your company name] since July 2012.

Please, let me know if you require extra information regarding Stanley. My contact number is [your contact details].

Kind Regards,

[Your name].”

Past employee verification

“[Name, job title, company name and address]

[Date]

[Recipient name, job title, company name and address]

Dear Mr. Scott,

This letter verifies that Angela was employed at [your company name] from April 2nd, 2015 to August 19th, 2021.

If you need any more information regarding Angela, please don’t hesitate to contact me on [your contact details].

Sincerely,

[Your name].”

Employee verification with salary

“[Name, job title, company name and address]

[Date]

[Recipient name, job title, company name and address]

Dear Mr. Scott,

Please accept this as proof of Jim’s employment with [your company name].

  • Name: Jim Halpert
  • Employment dates: February 3rd, 2010 — December 16, 2019
  • Job assistant: Senior Sales Executive
  • Salary: $70,000

Please reach out to me on [your contact details] should you require any more information.

Sincerely,

[Your name].”

A detailed employment verification letter

“[Name, job title, company name and address]

[Date]

[Recipient name, job title, company name and address]

Dear Mr. Scott,

This letter is to verify that Ryan worked at [your company name] from March 28th, 2011 to April 2nd, 2017 as Junior Salesman. During his employment, he was responsible for assisting our senior sales executives by traveling to clients, increasing sales and generally supporting the office.

Ryan’s annual salary was $30,000 per year.

Unfortunately, due to company policy, we cannot disclose the specifics of why Ryan was relieved of his duties. However, it stemmed from a company restructure. Should the opportunity arise, we would undoubtedly hire him again.

Please, let me know if you have any more questions. You can reach out to me on [your contact details] at any time and I’ll be happy to help.

Kind regards,

[Your name].”

What you’ll notice with the employment verification letter templates is that neither are overly complex. Even the detailed one is still concise and only highlights the requested information without going into depth.

Keep this in mind when writing an employment verification letter. The recipient only needs to know the critical information, so only share that with them.

Another thing to remember is to stay impartial. Don’t approach it with an overly positive or negative mindset. If the employee was excellent, still only answer the information that’s asked of you without doing the employee a disservice. You can still explain they were a great employee, but this isn’t the time or place for a glowing endorsement.

The same applies if it was a bad employee. You don’t need to over-explain what made them a bad fit, especially since a lot is riding on this employment verification letter. Again, explain that they worked at the company and answer all of the other information asked. If your policy allows and the recipient is asking for it, you could answer that you wouldn’t hire them again.

You aren’t trying to help somebody get their dream role or jeopardize somebody from landing a role. It’s a simple verification document.

Final thoughts

Whenever you receive a request to write an employment verification letter, always tailor it to fit the particular employee. You can use our templates as guidelines, but keep the letter and information specific to the employee in question. 

Before you start, check the company handbook so you know the process. The last thing you want is to share information your organization might not want you to share outright with another company. If there’s anything you can’t communicate, outline it in the letter that it’s your company policy not to disclose such information.

By following our simple tips and templates, it’ll make writing an employment verification letter a breeze. For more career tips, tricks and advice, make sure to head over to our blog.

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